Canada’s ‘Quiet’ Complicity

October 15, 2006

This post was originally made by me at “Blatherings” on 13 February 2005. It is repeated here due to revival of interest on the topic. (Video of Ann Coulter and Bob McKeown on CBC)

Or as present day Canadians so quaintly say, “Canada … took a pass on Vietnam” (Canada’s CBC spokesman, Bob McKeown, January 2005). “QUIET COMPLICITY: CANADIAN INVOLVEMENT IN THE VIETNAM WAR (1986) Between the Lines”

At first glance, a fair-minded person would say that both McKeown and Coulter were correct. Ann Coulter said “Canada sent troops to Vietnam,” which is certainly true in 1973, although she was probably thinking of the tens of thousands of Canadians who everyone knows were in service with American forces during the Vietnam era. Bob McKeown said “Canada didn’t send troops to Vietnam.” and if he was meaning the government of Canada, he would have been correct also.

Neither McKeown nor Coulter specified “the Canadian government.” However — Coulter never backed away from her original statement, although she may not have known the circumstances of the Canadian troops being in Vietnam. But McKeown embellished his statement, saying that “Canada … took a pass on Vietnam,” a statement that cannot be accepted by any fair-minded person. A polite person could say that Bob McKeown was ignorant of Canadian history. A more realistic person would say that Bob McKeown, spokesman of the Canadian government’s CBC, was misleading the Canadian people by rewriting history.

Took a Pass on Vietnam?

Canada’s Role in Vietnam


Canada’s Remembrance

October 11, 2006

Canada Forgets or Rewrites History?
The following post was made by Kerfuffles on 11 November 2005. It is repeated here due to revival of interest in the subject of Canada’s Involvement in the Vietnam War.

Canada Vietnam Medal As Canada prepares to honor her veterans during Veterans’ Week 2005, the following was posted at their Department of Defence Web site:

“During Veterans’ Week November 5-11, Canadians will pay tribute to those who fought in the two World Wars and the Korean Conflict. Their thoughts will also extend to CF members who died while serving Canada in peacekeeping and peace support operations during the past 50 years.”

Notice anyone missing amongst the veteran honorees? EARL McRAE of “The Ottawa Sun” explains as he reminds us of how Canada is treating her prodigal veterans on this Remembrance Day 2005: “Soldier won’t be attending today’s war memorial. Why? He fought in Vietnam.”

I heard the voice of the Lord, saying, Whom shall I send, and who will go for us? Then said I, Here am I; send me.” –Isaiah 6:8

In 1973, the International Commission of Control and Supervision Vietnam (ICCS) was responsible for securing the armistice that lasted two years from 1973 to 1975, known as Operation Gallant. Canada, a member of the commission, contributed Canadian Forces whose role was to monitor the cease-fire in South Vietnam, according to the Paris Peace Conference, and to arrange the release and exchange of more than 32,000 prisoners of war. The image here is of the Service Vietnam medal issued by the government of Canada to 253 members of the Canadian Armed Forces who served in Vietnam. **The Canadian Armed Forces won a Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts in Vietnam. This number does not include the thousands of Canadians who served in Vietnam or during the Vietnam era, nor does this figure include the 104 Canadians killed in that war, nor the seven missing in action; not to mention a winner of the Medal of Honor.

The Canadian government believed that because of its membership in ICCS, that Canada had to remain impartial during the Vietnam Conflict. While Canada as a nation was not involved in the fighting, Canadians themselves formed the largest foreign contingent in the U.S. military during the Vietnam era. Although exact numbers are not obtainable, some estimate that between 30,000 and 40,000 served and that 12,000 Canadians actually were in American uniforms in the war zone.

When the Canadian Vietnam veterans returned to their homeland, they were even more unwelcome than here in the United States, where at least returning veterans had access to government resources. Today’s Canadians have been “re-educated” to believe the fictional propaganda that Canada “took a pass on Vietnam”, as was told to them recently by Bob McKeown, a journalist of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. For Canadians to continue to see themselves as the world’s respected nation of “peacekeepers”, they cannot ever acknowledge the sacrifices of their fellow countrymen who fought on the battlefield against the scourge of Communism during the Cold War.

Canada did not “TAKE A PASS ON VIETNAM”! Canada was allied alongside the United States. With the advent of the Internet and Google, Canadians and Hate America Liberals can no longer get away with rewriting Canadian history.

Near the U.S. border there is one memorial, “The North Wall”, at Assumption Park, Windsor, Ontario, overlooking the Detroit River. It honors the 103 Canadians who lost their lives in Vietnam and the seven who went missing in action. It is a fine tribute to those Canadians who served and sacrificed all for their belief in freedom.

The Road to Hell – Canadian Forces in Vietnam 1954-1973 (pdf), by Major Shane B. Schreiber

“In Vietnam, the Canadian government’s good intentions created a road to Hell that was made all the more slippery by a policy designed to be deliberately ambiguous.”

The North Wall

Canadian Vets

Canada’s Forgotten Veterans

Oh Canada, We Stood On Guard for Thee

Canada Took a Pass on Vietnam?

**The Nobel Peace Prize referenced was awarded in 1988, when United Nations Peace-Keeping Forces were awarded THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE for all peace-keeping duties up to December 1988.


Remembrance Day 2005

November 9, 2006

There has been a long, ongoing quest within the community of Canadian Vietnam veterans to have the deaths of their comrades-in-arms formally remembered by the Canadian government on occasions such as Canada’s Remembrance Day. This quest continues.

On Canada’s Remembrance Day of 2005, the Canadian government had absolutely no sentiments of gratitude for the 20,000 or so fellow Canadians who served, nor for the more than 100 young Canucks who died, fighting for freedom and against communism during the Vietnam War.

Flowery words were spoken about brave soldiers who fought and died in World War I and World War II and the Korean War, but there were no words spoken about the long, bloody Cold War conflict known as the Vietnam War. Ambassadors from many nations, including former enemy nations, were invited to lay wreaths in commemoration of the sacrifices made by those who died in Canada’s 20th century wars, including Americans who chose to fight in the uniform of a foreign country, Canada. They, along with Canadian soldiers, were honored on Canada’s Remembrance Day. However, Canada refused to honor and respect the thousands of its own citizens who crossed the border to don the military uniform of the United States of America and fight against the world-wide scourge of communism during the Cold War.

However, when one visits the Veterans Affairs Canada website, there is this explanation of “Canada’s Day of Remembrance”:

Every year on November 11, Canadians pause in a silent moment of remembrance for the men and women who have served, and continue to serve our country during times of war, conflict and peace. We honour those who fought for Canada in the First World War (1914-1918), the Second World War (1939-1945), and the Korean War (1950-1953), as well as those who have served since then. More than 1,500,000 Canadians have served our country in this way, and more than 100,000 have died. They gave their lives and their futures so that we may live in peace.

The following is from an essay by Earl McRae that appeared in “The Ottawa Sun” of 11 November 2005:

There’ll be words spoken in the cold November air about our brave soldiers who fought and died in World War I and World War II and the Korean War, but there’ll be no words spoken about the long and terrible and bloody conflict known as the Vietnam War. There’ll be invited ambassadors with wreaths for the laying from countries that are our military allies, and from countries that were once our military enemies. There’ll be invited military personnel from countries that are our allies, and from countries that were once our enemies.

It will not be mentioned that among those whose sacrifice is being commemorated, who fought and who died in Canada’s 20th century wars, were Americans; Americans who chose to fight in the uniform of another country, our country. They, too, are being honoured this morning by Canada, but Canada is not honouring, and has not respected, the thousands of young Canadians who crossed the border to sign up for the Vietnam War wearing the uniform of the United States of America.

103 Canucks died in ‘Nam

It will not be mentioned that on the memorial in Washington, D.C., The Wall, with the names of the more than 58,000 U.S. soldiers killed in the Vietnam War, are the names of the 103 Canadians also killed.

It will not be mentioned that Canada, neutral in the Vietnam War, permitted some 30,000 American draft dodgers into the country as landed immigrants, along with numerous military deserters.

It will not be mentioned that Canada, the Canada who said Canadians signing with U.S. forces for Vietnam was a violation of Canada’s Foreign Enlistment Act of 1937 disallowing Canadians to serve in the military of a country at war with a nation Canada has no quarrel with, is the same and hypocritical Canada whose economy profited from the war by the sale to the American military between 1968 and 1973 of $2.7 billion worth of war materiel from guns to grenades to aircraft engines to military vehicles to boots to berets to napalm.

It will not be mentioned that Canada, who wouldn’t send troops, Canada, who opposed Canadians joining the U.S. military to fight, is the Canada whose delegates to the various peace commissions willingly undertook spy work for the CIA, helped the Americans to secretly bring more troops and arms into South Vietnam, helped the U.S. keep the chemical defoliant program from the public, permitted the U.S. military to test Agent Orange destined for Vietnam at Camp Gagetown, N.B., permitted U.S. bombers to practise their carpet-bombing runs near Suffield, Alta., and North Battleford, Sask.

The Canadian Vietnam Veterans Association, with branches across Canada, has not been invited to the Remembrance Day service this morning. If the association, or any individual Canadian Vietnam vets, wish to use the War Memorial for wreath laying to honour their Canadian comrades, along with our soldiers in all the wars, they will have to do so detached from the official ceremony and — as they have in the past — when eyes are looking the other way.

Along the Detroit River in Windsor, Ontario, there is a small, privately funded monument to those Canadians killed in the Vietnam War, The North Wall. When surviving Canadian veterans returned home to Canada from the battlefields of Asia, they encountered a nation that had changed dramatically into a society that was strongly anti-war, anti-Vietnam veteran and pro draft-dodgers and military deserters. With no veterans groups to assist them, nor any help whatsoever from the Canadian government, many of these Vietnam vets relocated permanently to the United States.

Will Remembrance Day 2006 be any different? We shall see and we shall report it here.

Canada’s Remembrance Day Defined

Canadian Hawks Fly South


Memorial to Draft-dodgers

October 30, 2006

Where? Where else – Canada!

Last year when I was researching Canada’s role during the Vietnam War and learning about that nation’s refusal to honor at official Remembrance Day ceremonies her own Canadian citizens who served in combat during the Vietnam War, I was shocked to find these enlightening news stories. Fortunately for Canadians, America’s veterans came to the rescue and put a stop to the insanity, once again saving Canada from herself. I made the following post at “Blatherings”, 10 February 2005, and I repeat it here on the eve of Canada’s Remembrance Day 2006.

Canadian Vietnam Draft-dodger Memorial

Canada’s new memorial will honor the ‘courageous legacy of Vietnam War resisters.’ Canadians have a quaint definition of courage – burn your draft card, slink across the border and then take a job in Canada’s booming Vietnam economy, manufacturing munitions and Agent Orange to be used in Viet Nam. No wonder they are screaming bloody murder at Ann Coulter for reminding them of their “true” role in Vietnam. I thought this was a hoax, but sadly, it is not.

According to news reports, Canada is planning to build a Canadian Vietnam Draft-dodger Memorial. The dedication of the bronze statue honoring draft-dodgers is planned for July 2006 in Nelson, British Columbia, about 140 miles north of Spokane, Washington.

Draft-dodger memorial to be built in British Columbia
Last Updated Wed, 08 Sep 2004 11:27:18 EDT

CBC News
NELSON, B.C. – B.C. activists plan to erect a bronze sculpture honouring draft dodgers, four decades after Americans opposed to the Vietnam War sought refuge in Canada.

The memorial, created by artists in Nelson, B.C., ties into a two-day celebration planned for July 2006 that pays tribute to as many as 125,000 Americans who fled to Canada between 1964 and 1977.

“This will mark the courageous legacy of Vietnam War resisters and the Canadians who helped them resettle in this country during that tumultuous era,” Isaac Romano, the director of the Our Way Home festival told a news conference in Nelson Tuesday.

The event will honour people who came to Canada and resisted war efforts, from burning their draft cards during the Vietnam War to leaving the army to protest the war in Iraq, Romano said.

Seeking Sanctuary (CBC link no longer operative)

Draft-dodger Memorial Angers VFW
Hey guys, chill out. Canada will go down in history as the only country ever to commemorate the “courageous legacy” of draft-dodgers and deserters. A first!

Meet Courageous Draft Dodgers

George Bush Saves Canada From Herself

Draft-dodgers and Deserters Reunion 2007


Troops or Mercenaries?

October 26, 2006

Canadian Mercenaries

Although it was never built due to American outrage, last year Canadians had a grandiose plan to erect a bronze memorial to American Draft-dodgers and Deserters. So what are their feelings about the Canadian citizens who served with the non-draft-dodging Americans in Vietnam, to whom they have never given any official positive recognition? “Mercenaries” is the operative word. Pundit Ann Coulter has been roundly trashed because she revealed to Canadians that “Canada sent troops to Vietnam”. I have become more enlightened from my research on the subject, such that I now believe that Canadians object to the word “troops,” as they consider that their young countrymen who were drafted or signed on for military service with the United States weremercenaries.”

Remembering Canada’s Role in the Vietnam War
by Robin Collins, Peace and Environment News”, November 11th, 1992

The idea of Canadian complicity in the Vietnam war was once contrary to the customary mythology that “Americans fought and killed in Vietnam while Canadians opened their doors to conscientious objectors.” But these days, as memories fade and Vietnam war revisionism is buoyed by the end of the Cold War, there are new calls for official government recognition of the estimated 10,000 Canadians who served in Indochina as mercenaries. There has been de facto recognition already as a result of increased visibility of these soldiers at Remembrance Day ceremonies but some want the government to establish monuments to honour Canadian Vietnam war veterans. Is this a good idea?”

On Canada’s Remembrance Day, November 11th, 1992, “Peace and Environment News” asked “… some want the government to establish monuments to honour Canadian Vietnam war veterans. Is this a good idea?” Obviously, the answer to that question was “NO, it is not a good idea to honor Canadian Vietnam war veterans.” After all, there has been no honor given to them and now, fourteen years later, the Canadian government is rewriting history so that current generations do not even know there were Canadian soldiers fighting in Vietnam.

Canada’s Vietnam Veterans


Who are the Ignoramuses?

October 21, 2006

This post was originally made on 8 February 2005 at “Blatherings.”

Who are the Ignoramuses? They are Bob McKeown of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and self described “veteran political journalist”, Doug Ireland, who say that Canada “took a pass on Vietnam”.

Coulter: “I think you’re wrong

McKeown: “No, took a pass on Vietnam.”

Coulter: “I think you’re wrong.”

  • Bob McKeown is a Canadian; Ann Coulter is NOT!
  • Bob McKeown is a journalist; Ann Coulter is NOT!
  • Bob McKeown works for CBC; Ann Coulter does NOT work for FOX News!
  • Bob McKeown says that Canada “took a pass on Vietnam”.
  • Ann Coulter says Canada did NOT take a pass on the Vietnam War!

Who is more correct? Who knows more about Canadian history and who is more responsible as a journalist? NOT Bob McKeown! NOT Doug Ireland, who describes himself as a “veteran political journalist”. Ann Coulter is right again! Ann Coulter wins anyway you look at these ridiculous pieces of muckraking drivel.

Why are the bloggers scrutinizing Coulter’s statement to the nth degree, while ignoring Bob McKeown’s blatant fictional propaganda that Canada “took a pass on Vietnam”? Shouldn’t they hold a member of the high and mighty Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to at least a minimum of journalism standards? When McKeown said that Canada “took a pass on Vietnam”, he exposed himself as someone unwilling to acknowledge the sacrifices of his fellow countrymen and as someone ignorant of the history of his own country during the Vietnam era.

Canada did NOT “TAKE A PASS ON VIETNAM”! Canada was allied alongside the United States. Canadians and Hate America Libs can no longer get away with rewriting history. We have Google now. And to those “truth-seeking Canadians” I say, help is on the way. FOX News cometh and the wiley FOX will eateth the breakfast, lunch and dinner of CBC.

The Blue Maple Leaf

BTW: What is the CBC? The CBC is the voice of the Liberal party of Canada. The CBC is a propaganda tool to spread the Liberal party’s agenda. The CBC is paid for by Canadian tax payers. The CBC is a very low rated channel because almost no one listens to it. The CBC is a waste of government resources that is supported by the Liberals. (Kinda sounds like PBS in the US.)


Doug Ireland’s Hit Piece

October 21, 2006

I originally published this post at “Blatherings” in February 2005.

Doug Ireland published a hit piece at his blog calling Ann Coulter all sorts of names because she said that Canada had troops in Vietnam. Well, I made two posts there giving links and information that Ann was correct, and he deleted them. So when you read his blog, all you will read are accolades to his scourge of Ann, nothing in her defense, even though she was correct. And he refers to himself as “a veteran political journalist”. Oh yeah – journalism, let’s not hear any rebuttals!

This is what I posted at Mr. Veteran Polical Journalist’s (Doug Ireland, Muckrucker of Bileland) blog that he does not want you to read:

Mr. Ireland writes about Ann Coulter “she was exposed for the arrogant fool she is.” My question is, what kind of arrogant fool would write a statement such as “Canada did not send troops to Vietnam”, without first making a Google search? Well, we know of at least two such “arrogant fools” – Mr. Ireland and Mr. McKeown. Of course, being the men that they are, we must excuse them, as they were obviously mesmerized by Ann Coulter’s legs. Mr. Ireland displays his mindset with his choice of title, “ANN COULTER STICKS HER ENTIRE LEG IN HER MOUTH”. Even in that contorted position, Ann Coulter, knew what she was talking about! The rest of you are merely gluttons for punishment. Therefore, I sentence you to Ann Coulter Hell.

More on Doug Ireland

The Video from CBC of Ann Coulter and Bob McKeown


Ann Coulter Was Right! (2)

October 11, 2006

I published the following essay on Monday, February 07, 2005 at “Blatherings:”

Canadian Broadcasting Company’s Bob McKeown was hosting a TV broadcast “The Fifth Estate,” on January 26 which devoted one hour to show Canadians how the American media have been high jacked by conservative bullies. Strident conservative pundit and personality, Ann Coulter, was interviewed during which the following exchange occurred:

Coulter: “Canada used to be one of our most loyal friends and vice-versa. I mean Canada sent troops to Vietnam – was Vietnam less containable and more of a threat than Saddam Hussein?”

McKeown interrupts: “Canada didn’t send troops to Vietnam.”

Coulter: “I don’t think that’s right.”

Since that interview, (Video from CBC of Ann Coulter and Bob McKeown), Coulter has been unmercilessly attacked for saying that Canada sent troops to Vietnam. She has been called an epithet-throwing fictionalist, liar, loudmouth ignoramus, outrageous nationalist and described as empty-headed and shameful, and this in just one editorial, by Doug Ireland at Driland! By doing a short Google search, I discovered that Ann Coulter was correct. There is nothing like the truth to send the liberals into the out of control spin zone.

In 1973 the International Commission of Control and Supervision Vietnam (ICCS) was responsible for securing the armistice that lasted two years from 1973 to 1975, known as Operation Gallant. Canada, a member of the commission, contributed 240 Canadian Forces whose role was to monitor the cease-fire in South Vietnam, according to the Paris Peace Conference, and to arrange the release and exchange of more than 32,000 prisoners of war. In addition, ten to forty thousand Canadians, voluntarily served in Vietnam or during the Vietnam era with the American military, of whom 111 Canadians, were lost. One Canadian soldier, Toronto born Peter C. Lemon, won the Congressional Medal of Honor.

The Canadian government believed that because of its membership in ICCS, that Canada had to remain impartial during the Vietnam Conflict. While Canada as a nation was not involved in the fighting, Canadians themselves formed the largest foreign contingent in the U.S. military during the Vietnam era. Although exact numbers are not obtainable, some estimate that between 30,000 and 40,000 served and that 12,000 Canadians actually were in American uniforms in the war zone. The Canadian Armed Forces won a Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts in Vietnam.

When the Canadian Vietnam veterans returned to their homeland, they were even more unwelcome than here in the United States, where at least returning veterans had access to government resources. Today, there is a memorial, “The North Wall”, at Assumption Park, Windsor, Ontario, overlooking the Detroit River. It honors the 103 Canadians who lost their lives in Vietnam and the seven who went missing in action. It is a fine tribute to those Canadians who served and sacrificed all for their belief in freedom.

Canada’s Quiet Complicity

O Canada, We Stood On Guard For Thee

Troops or Mercenaries?

Ignoramuses

Canada Took A Pass On Vietnam?

Video From Canada’s CBC

Mysteries of Canada

Canada’s Remembrance

War Profiteer in Peacenik Clothing

Canada’s North Wall


Ann Coulter Was Right!

July 17, 2006

Dumped, Dropped, Canned

With her book at #2 on Amazon, it probably does not much matter to Ann Coulter that she is now being fired by national publications for her latest screeds. Harridan to Liberals, heroine to Right-wingers, she is not Kerfuffles’ choice for a representative of Conservatism, although conservative she is indeed. Like her or love her, she is entertaining when she displays the distinctive public persona she has so meticulously crafted. Whisking away her long blond hair from her always sleeveless shoulders, she drives Liberals wild, especially those of the female variety. Since the publication of her latest screed, “Godless”, she has taken to wearing a Christian cross to appropriately accentuate her plunging neckline, or is it vice-versa?

However, even Kerfuffles has defended Ann Coulter when “Ann Coulter Was Right!” (from my former blog, “Blatherings”, of Monday, February 07, 2005).

Canadian Broadcasting Company’s Bob McKeown was hosting a TV broadcast “The Fifth Estate,” on January 26th, which devoted one hour to show Canadians how the American media have been high jacked by conservative bullies. Strident conservative pundit and personality, Ann Coulter, was interviewed during which the following exchange occurred:

Coulter: “Canada used to be one of our most loyal friends and vice-versa. I mean Canada sent troops to Vietnam – was Vietnam less containable and more of a threat than Saddam Hussein?”

McKeown interrupts: “Canada didn’t send troops to Vietnam.”

Coulter: “I don’t think that’s right.”

Since that interview, Coulter has been unmercilessly attacked for saying that Canada sent troops to Vietnam. She has been called an epithet-throwing fictionalist, liar, loudmouth ignoramus, outrageous nationalist and described as empty-headed and shameful, and this in just one editorial, by Doug Ireland at Driland! By doing a short Google search, I discovered that Ann Coulter was correct. There is nothing like the truth to send the liberals into the out of control spin zone.

In 1973, the International Commission of Control and Supervision Vietnam (ICCS) was responsible for securing the armistice that lasted two years from 1973 to 1975, known as Operation Gallant. Canada, a member of the commission, contributed 240 Canadian Forces whose role was to monitor the cease-fire in South Vietnam, according to the Paris Peace Conference, and to arrange the release and exchange of more than 32,000 prisoners of war. In addition, ten to forty thousand Canadians, voluntarily served in Vietnam or during the Vietnam era with the American military, of whom 111 Canadians, were lost. One Canadian soldier, Toronto born Peter C. Lemon, won the Congressional Medal of Honor.

The Canadian government believed that because of its membership in ICCS, that Canada had to remain impartial during the Vietnam Conflict. While Canada as a nation was not involved in the fighting, Canadians themselves formed the largest foreign contingent in the U.S. military during the Vietnam era. Although exact numbers are not obtainable, some estimate that between 30,000 and 40,000 served and that 12,000 Canadians actually were in American uniforms in the war zone.

Because it is almost a state secret, most Canadians do not even know that their own Canadian Armed Forces won a Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts in Vietnam.

When the Canadian Vietnam veterans returned to their homeland, they were even more unwelcome than here in the United States, where at least returning veterans had access to government resources. Today, there is a memorial, “The North Wall”, at Assumption Park, Windsor, Ontario, overlooking the Detroit River. It honors the 103 Canadians who lost their lives in Vietnam and the seven who went missing in action. It is a fine tribute to those Canadians who served and sacrificed all for their belief in freedom.

Canada’s Good $en$e

Canadian Vets


In Remembrance 2005

May 29, 2005

“That memory may their deed redeem,
When, like our sires, our sons are gone.
Spirit, that made those heros dare
To die, and leave their children free.”
~~Emerson, 1837

Battle Hymn of the Republic is from rmcccentral.com, sequenced by Perfessor Bill Edwards.

Because of the nature of humankind, ever there will be wars. Two of my sons were in military service during the Gulf War. When I was a young wife, my husband served three tours of duty in Vietnam. My father was too young to serve in World War I and too old for World War II. My grandfather tried to enlist in World War I, both in Canada and the U.S., but was rejected. Those two were lucky. My great grandfather was called up for the Boer War while living in Africa. My Virginia forefathers served in the War of Northern Agression, the War of 1812, the American Revolution and on back through the Colonial Wars.

I was reading “Tidbits on Terrorism” at Hyscience and a found a new link to ARGGHHH! I got this above idea from ARGGHHH! , who blogs on “Memorial Day 2005“:

“I am the great-grandson of a soldier of the Civil War.
I am the grandson of a soldier of the Great War.
I am the son of a soldier of Korea, and Vietnam.
I was a “Brat”.
I was a soldier.
I am still a soldier, albeit in the Retired Reserve.

ARGGHHH! then tells the story, via e-mails from a friend, of Lieutenant Leonard Cowherd, 1st Platoon, C 1/37 Armor, USMA 2003, who was killed yesterday in Iraq. Freedom is a costly goal, yet we who have known its joy cannot live without it. This is a heart-rending story.

“My son-in-law, 2LT Cowherd, was killed this morning in Iraq. He is the armor soldier currently being referred to in the news. Platoon Leader. USMA class of ’03.

“My daughter has been staying with us since Leonard deployed. I was with her when the car pulled in the driveway and she was notified by the team from Ft Eustis tonight. Surreal is not the word.

“You can imagine that this is a numbing time for us.

“We expect an onslaught of details and issues tomorrow. I will be at home until such time as we are settled.

“I know you’ll ask, ‘Is there anything I can do?’ I appreciate and I will not hesitate to call should something arise.”

LINKS For MEMORIAL DAY 2005
Spirit of 9-11
Declaration of 76
The Vietnam Wall
This Land Is My Land
Bless Those Who Serve
Rally ’round the Flag
In Memory of Our Honored Dead
Memorial Day at Davis Virtual Market