My Country – My World

October 22, 2006

Flickr Photograph

Eternal Words of Thomas Paine:
“These are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph”.

Thomas Paine, an American revolutionary and 18th century free thinker was born 1737, at Thetford, England where this memorial and slogan was photographed: “My country is the World … My religion is to do good”.

Save To: gif ”Digg” The image, Thomas Paine Message, is subject to copyright by Trojan_Llama. It is posted here with permission via the Flickr API by barneykin.


Who are the Ignoramuses?

October 21, 2006

This post was originally made on 8 February 2005 at “Blatherings.”

Who are the Ignoramuses? They are Bob McKeown of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and self described “veteran political journalist”, Doug Ireland, who say that Canada “took a pass on Vietnam”.

Coulter: “I think you’re wrong

McKeown: “No, took a pass on Vietnam.”

Coulter: “I think you’re wrong.”

  • Bob McKeown is a Canadian; Ann Coulter is NOT!
  • Bob McKeown is a journalist; Ann Coulter is NOT!
  • Bob McKeown works for CBC; Ann Coulter does NOT work for FOX News!
  • Bob McKeown says that Canada “took a pass on Vietnam”.
  • Ann Coulter says Canada did NOT take a pass on the Vietnam War!

Who is more correct? Who knows more about Canadian history and who is more responsible as a journalist? NOT Bob McKeown! NOT Doug Ireland, who describes himself as a “veteran political journalist”. Ann Coulter is right again! Ann Coulter wins anyway you look at these ridiculous pieces of muckraking drivel.

Why are the bloggers scrutinizing Coulter’s statement to the nth degree, while ignoring Bob McKeown’s blatant fictional propaganda that Canada “took a pass on Vietnam”? Shouldn’t they hold a member of the high and mighty Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to at least a minimum of journalism standards? When McKeown said that Canada “took a pass on Vietnam”, he exposed himself as someone unwilling to acknowledge the sacrifices of his fellow countrymen and as someone ignorant of the history of his own country during the Vietnam era.

Canada did NOT “TAKE A PASS ON VIETNAM”! Canada was allied alongside the United States. Canadians and Hate America Libs can no longer get away with rewriting history. We have Google now. And to those “truth-seeking Canadians” I say, help is on the way. FOX News cometh and the wiley FOX will eateth the breakfast, lunch and dinner of CBC.

The Blue Maple Leaf

BTW: What is the CBC? The CBC is the voice of the Liberal party of Canada. The CBC is a propaganda tool to spread the Liberal party’s agenda. The CBC is paid for by Canadian tax payers. The CBC is a very low rated channel because almost no one listens to it. The CBC is a waste of government resources that is supported by the Liberals. (Kinda sounds like PBS in the US.)


Doug Ireland’s Hit Piece

October 21, 2006

I originally published this post at “Blatherings” in February 2005.

Doug Ireland published a hit piece at his blog calling Ann Coulter all sorts of names because she said that Canada had troops in Vietnam. Well, I made two posts there giving links and information that Ann was correct, and he deleted them. So when you read his blog, all you will read are accolades to his scourge of Ann, nothing in her defense, even though she was correct. And he refers to himself as “a veteran political journalist”. Oh yeah – journalism, let’s not hear any rebuttals!

This is what I posted at Mr. Veteran Polical Journalist’s (Doug Ireland, Muckrucker of Bileland) blog that he does not want you to read:

Mr. Ireland writes about Ann Coulter “she was exposed for the arrogant fool she is.” My question is, what kind of arrogant fool would write a statement such as “Canada did not send troops to Vietnam”, without first making a Google search? Well, we know of at least two such “arrogant fools” – Mr. Ireland and Mr. McKeown. Of course, being the men that they are, we must excuse them, as they were obviously mesmerized by Ann Coulter’s legs. Mr. Ireland displays his mindset with his choice of title, “ANN COULTER STICKS HER ENTIRE LEG IN HER MOUTH”. Even in that contorted position, Ann Coulter, knew what she was talking about! The rest of you are merely gluttons for punishment. Therefore, I sentence you to Ann Coulter Hell.

More on Doug Ireland

The Video from CBC of Ann Coulter and Bob McKeown


Video from Canada’s CBC

October 20, 2006

This video from January of 2005, is at the heart of my postings on Canada and her disgraceful shunning of her own Vietnam veterans. The video is of Ann Coulter being interviewed on Canada’s Public Television by Bob McKeown:

Regarding the McKeown/Coulter exchange at the heart of my posts, at first glance, a fair-minded person would say that both McKeown and Coulter were correct. Ann Coulter said “Canada sent troops to Vietnam,” which was certainly true in 1973, although she was probably thinking of the tens of thousands of Canadians who everyone knows were in service with American forces during the Vietnam era. Bob McKeown said “Canada didn’t send troops to Vietnam.” and if he was meaning the government of Canada, he would have been correct also.

However …. neither McKeown nor Coulter specified “the Canadian government.” Although Ann Coulter never backed away from her original statement, although she may not have known the circumstances of the Canadian troops being in Vietnam, Canadian journalist Bob McKeown embellished his statement, saying that “Canada … took a pass on Vietnam,” a statement that cannot be accepted by any fair-minded person.

A polite person could say that Canadian journalist Bob McKeown was ignorant of Canadian history. A more realistic person would say that Bob McKeown, spokesman of the Canadian government’s CBC, was misleading the Canadian people by rewriting history.

As for Ann Coulter, she is not a Canadian and she has never claimed to be a student of Canadian history. She was stating what she believed to be true … and guess what, it was. As for Bob McKeown, and other ignorant Canadians who have condemned Ms. Coulter, they need to become more aware of just what their country was all about during the Vietnam era.

“Canada Took A Pass On Vietnam?” — give me a break from Canadian fairy tales!


O Canada, We Stood On Guard For Thee

October 18, 2006

I originally made this post on 9 February 2005 at “Blatherings”. It is repeated here because of new interest in the subject and to remind Canadians of their “other” veterans that they do not include in their upcoming Remembrance Day in November.

O Canada, we stood on guard for thee.

Recently, an American pundit, Ann Coulter, has been ridiculed for believing that there were Canadian troops in Vietnam. Why does she think they were there? Because they were there, as the image above demonstrates. The soldiers in battle proudly posted the ensign of their beloved land. However, their country, Canada, does not return that respect.

Tens of thousands of Canadians crossed the border to join up with the American military during the era of the Vietnam War. Over one hundred Canadians lost their lives in battle. One Canadian won the Congressional Medal of Honor. Today, Canada points with pride to the fact that they welcomed with open arms, America’s military deserters and draft evaders, yet they do not acknowledge their own citizens who fought against the evils of communism during the Cold War.

It seems the present Canadian government is attempting to rewrite the history of their country’s involvement in the Vietnam War. Recently, Ms. Coulter, on a government supported Canadian broadcast, lauded the Canadian troops that fought in that war. She was rudely slapped down and told that she was wrong. The host, Bob McKeown, an employee of the government controlled Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) told her and his viewers that Canada took a pass on Vietnam.


Good News for Disabled Vets

October 16, 2006

The court’s favorable ruling in this case expands significantly the government’s “duty to assist” mentally ill veterans.

I posted previously about the veterans’ case, “Disabled Veterans,” argued last spring by Mr. James R. Barney, of Finnegan Henderson, Washington DC, BARRETT v. DVA. According to Mr. Barney, as of 11 October 2006, the case has been decided and it is a very good result for the veteran. Perhaps it is not such a good result for the American taxpayers, and for that they can thank former President George H.W. Bush.

The United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has reversed and remanded the Veterans Court’s decision in Barrett v. DVA, which was handled pro bono by the Finnegan Henderson Law Firm at oral argument. This is an important veterans decision that significantly and positively affects the rights of veterans who are appealing adverse decisions from the Board of Veterans Appeals. In short, Mr. Barrett was seeking to establish equitable tolling based on mental incapacity in order to preserve his appeal, which had been dismissed for failure to timely file his NOA. He asked the Veterans Administration to provide a psychiatric examination to help him establish the strict criteria for proving equitable tolling. The VA refused to provide an examination, arguing that it had no duty to assist the veteran once his case was on appeal. The veteran appealed that decision to the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.

The ruling of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, authored by Judge MAYER, is quite broad and will likely have an immediate and beneficial impact on mentally ill veterans, of whom there are many, who find themselves caught between the non-adversarial and adversarial systems of the appeals process. The following quote sums up the ruling:

“Here Barrett specifically requested a medical examination by DVA doctors to clarify the nature of his mental incapacity during the appeals period. Because such an exam will plainly assist in clarifying his entitlement to equitable tolling, is consistent with the kinds of evidence uniquely within the knowledge and competence of the government . . ., and ensure the reality and appearance of systemic fairness, the Secretary shall provide Barrett with his requested medical examination, as well as any other assistance deemed reasonably necessary by the Veterans Court.”

That is a good result for veterans.


Canada’s ‘Quiet’ Complicity

October 15, 2006

This post was originally made by me at “Blatherings” on 13 February 2005. It is repeated here due to revival of interest on the topic. (Video of Ann Coulter and Bob McKeown on CBC)

Or as present day Canadians so quaintly say, “Canada … took a pass on Vietnam” (Canada’s CBC spokesman, Bob McKeown, January 2005). “QUIET COMPLICITY: CANADIAN INVOLVEMENT IN THE VIETNAM WAR (1986) Between the Lines”

At first glance, a fair-minded person would say that both McKeown and Coulter were correct. Ann Coulter said “Canada sent troops to Vietnam,” which is certainly true in 1973, although she was probably thinking of the tens of thousands of Canadians who everyone knows were in service with American forces during the Vietnam era. Bob McKeown said “Canada didn’t send troops to Vietnam.” and if he was meaning the government of Canada, he would have been correct also.

Neither McKeown nor Coulter specified “the Canadian government.” However — Coulter never backed away from her original statement, although she may not have known the circumstances of the Canadian troops being in Vietnam. But McKeown embellished his statement, saying that “Canada … took a pass on Vietnam,” a statement that cannot be accepted by any fair-minded person. A polite person could say that Bob McKeown was ignorant of Canadian history. A more realistic person would say that Bob McKeown, spokesman of the Canadian government’s CBC, was misleading the Canadian people by rewriting history.

Took a Pass on Vietnam?

Canada’s Role in Vietnam


Canada Took a Pass on Vietnam?

October 13, 2006

Remembering Canada’s Role in the Vietnam War, I published the following essay at “Blatherings” on 10 February 2005. It is republished here due to revival of interest in the subject. (Video of Ann Coulter and Bob McKeown on CBC)

Has Canada shifted so far left that she is now a “denier” nation?

Canada didn’t send troops to Vietnam, took a pass on Vietnam“. Bob McKeown, spokesman of Canada‘s government-owned television network, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, spoke those words on a program designed to showcase the professionalism and journalistic integrity of Canada’s state sponsored news media, as opposed to the “supposed” lack thereof and conservative slant in the privately controlled American news media, January 26, 2005. To date, no one from the CBC, nor from the Canadian government has come forth to correct that grievous and disgraceful statement.

What exactly was Canada’s role in providing troops during the Vietnam War? Although in reality Canada was supportive of the U.S. goals in Southeast Asia, the Canadian government believed that because of its membership in the International Commission of Control and Supervision (ICCS), that it needed to be impartial during the Vietnam Conflict. At the same time that the U.S. was becoming involved in Southeast Asia, Canadian military forces were being permanently down sized. As it was no longer offering military training to its young citizens, which had been a long-standing Canadian tradition, Canada did nothing to hinder the tens of thousands of its citizens crossing the U.S.-Canadian border to sign up for the war. It would be fair to say that they crossed over with the blessing of Canada. Many young Canadian men living in the U.S. allowed themselves to be drafted. Tens of thousands of other Canadian youths crossed the border to sign on with the United States Armed Forces. They wanted to obtain some of the military skills that were not available in their own country, such as aircraft piloting and mechanics. Some joined for the noble cause of fighting the growing scourge of communism, while others were seeking adventure or signing on for personal reasons.

As a direct result of Canadian official and unofficial policies, these citizens of Canada formed the largest foreign fighting contingent in the U.S. military during the Vietnam era. The exact numbers are unknown. Most estimates range between 30,000 and 40,000 uniformed Canadians in service, and 12,000 Canadians in the war zone.

When the Canadian Vietnam veterans returned to their homeland, they were even less welcome than here in the United States. American veterans had access to veterans groups and government resources, whereas in Canada the Vietnam veterans were ignored and shunned. They returned to a Canada whose government policies had changed radically. Although they had fought a noble war for a noble cause, their countrymen did not accept them as noble veterans. The official Canadian view was that “Vietnam was not Canada’s war. Ottawa didn’t send troops – but sent a lot of other things, like medical clinics, doctors and nurses. As a result, they kept so quiet about their service, that forty years years later, new generations are easily spoonfed the government propaganda line that “Canada didn’t send troops to Vietnam, took a pass on Vietnam“, as was emphatically declared by a spokesman on Canada’s government sponsored television, January 27th of this year.

Peter C. Lemon, born in Toronto, Canada, was a recipient of the Medal of Honor. He was the only Canadian citizen to win this medal while serving in the Vietnam War. At the Vietnam Memorial in Washington, there are 104 names engraved of those Canadians lost in battle or captured or missing in action. While refusing to acknowledge Canadian soldiers in American uniforms, Canada issued a Service Vietnam Medal to the 352 Canadian Forces participating in Vietnam with the ICCS’s Operation Gallant, January 1973.

Did peace-loving, humanitarian” Canada send anything other than troops to Vietnam? Ever hear of Agent Orange?


Ann Coulter Was Right! (2)

October 11, 2006

I published the following essay on Monday, February 07, 2005 at “Blatherings:”

Canadian Broadcasting Company’s Bob McKeown was hosting a TV broadcast “The Fifth Estate,” on January 26 which devoted one hour to show Canadians how the American media have been high jacked by conservative bullies. Strident conservative pundit and personality, Ann Coulter, was interviewed during which the following exchange occurred:

Coulter: “Canada used to be one of our most loyal friends and vice-versa. I mean Canada sent troops to Vietnam – was Vietnam less containable and more of a threat than Saddam Hussein?”

McKeown interrupts: “Canada didn’t send troops to Vietnam.”

Coulter: “I don’t think that’s right.”

Since that interview, (Video from CBC of Ann Coulter and Bob McKeown), Coulter has been unmercilessly attacked for saying that Canada sent troops to Vietnam. She has been called an epithet-throwing fictionalist, liar, loudmouth ignoramus, outrageous nationalist and described as empty-headed and shameful, and this in just one editorial, by Doug Ireland at Driland! By doing a short Google search, I discovered that Ann Coulter was correct. There is nothing like the truth to send the liberals into the out of control spin zone.

In 1973 the International Commission of Control and Supervision Vietnam (ICCS) was responsible for securing the armistice that lasted two years from 1973 to 1975, known as Operation Gallant. Canada, a member of the commission, contributed 240 Canadian Forces whose role was to monitor the cease-fire in South Vietnam, according to the Paris Peace Conference, and to arrange the release and exchange of more than 32,000 prisoners of war. In addition, ten to forty thousand Canadians, voluntarily served in Vietnam or during the Vietnam era with the American military, of whom 111 Canadians, were lost. One Canadian soldier, Toronto born Peter C. Lemon, won the Congressional Medal of Honor.

The Canadian government believed that because of its membership in ICCS, that Canada had to remain impartial during the Vietnam Conflict. While Canada as a nation was not involved in the fighting, Canadians themselves formed the largest foreign contingent in the U.S. military during the Vietnam era. Although exact numbers are not obtainable, some estimate that between 30,000 and 40,000 served and that 12,000 Canadians actually were in American uniforms in the war zone. The Canadian Armed Forces won a Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts in Vietnam.

When the Canadian Vietnam veterans returned to their homeland, they were even more unwelcome than here in the United States, where at least returning veterans had access to government resources. Today, there is a memorial, “The North Wall”, at Assumption Park, Windsor, Ontario, overlooking the Detroit River. It honors the 103 Canadians who lost their lives in Vietnam and the seven who went missing in action. It is a fine tribute to those Canadians who served and sacrificed all for their belief in freedom.

Canada’s Quiet Complicity

O Canada, We Stood On Guard For Thee

Troops or Mercenaries?

Ignoramuses

Canada Took A Pass On Vietnam?

Video From Canada’s CBC

Mysteries of Canada

Canada’s Remembrance

War Profiteer in Peacenik Clothing

Canada’s North Wall


Canada’s Remembrance

October 11, 2006

Canada Forgets or Rewrites History?
The following post was made by Kerfuffles on 11 November 2005. It is repeated here due to revival of interest in the subject of Canada’s Involvement in the Vietnam War.

Canada Vietnam Medal As Canada prepares to honor her veterans during Veterans’ Week 2005, the following was posted at their Department of Defence Web site:

“During Veterans’ Week November 5-11, Canadians will pay tribute to those who fought in the two World Wars and the Korean Conflict. Their thoughts will also extend to CF members who died while serving Canada in peacekeeping and peace support operations during the past 50 years.”

Notice anyone missing amongst the veteran honorees? EARL McRAE of “The Ottawa Sun” explains as he reminds us of how Canada is treating her prodigal veterans on this Remembrance Day 2005: “Soldier won’t be attending today’s war memorial. Why? He fought in Vietnam.”

I heard the voice of the Lord, saying, Whom shall I send, and who will go for us? Then said I, Here am I; send me.” –Isaiah 6:8

In 1973, the International Commission of Control and Supervision Vietnam (ICCS) was responsible for securing the armistice that lasted two years from 1973 to 1975, known as Operation Gallant. Canada, a member of the commission, contributed Canadian Forces whose role was to monitor the cease-fire in South Vietnam, according to the Paris Peace Conference, and to arrange the release and exchange of more than 32,000 prisoners of war. The image here is of the Service Vietnam medal issued by the government of Canada to 253 members of the Canadian Armed Forces who served in Vietnam. **The Canadian Armed Forces won a Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts in Vietnam. This number does not include the thousands of Canadians who served in Vietnam or during the Vietnam era, nor does this figure include the 104 Canadians killed in that war, nor the seven missing in action; not to mention a winner of the Medal of Honor.

The Canadian government believed that because of its membership in ICCS, that Canada had to remain impartial during the Vietnam Conflict. While Canada as a nation was not involved in the fighting, Canadians themselves formed the largest foreign contingent in the U.S. military during the Vietnam era. Although exact numbers are not obtainable, some estimate that between 30,000 and 40,000 served and that 12,000 Canadians actually were in American uniforms in the war zone.

When the Canadian Vietnam veterans returned to their homeland, they were even more unwelcome than here in the United States, where at least returning veterans had access to government resources. Today’s Canadians have been “re-educated” to believe the fictional propaganda that Canada “took a pass on Vietnam”, as was told to them recently by Bob McKeown, a journalist of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. For Canadians to continue to see themselves as the world’s respected nation of “peacekeepers”, they cannot ever acknowledge the sacrifices of their fellow countrymen who fought on the battlefield against the scourge of Communism during the Cold War.

Canada did not “TAKE A PASS ON VIETNAM”! Canada was allied alongside the United States. With the advent of the Internet and Google, Canadians and Hate America Liberals can no longer get away with rewriting Canadian history.

Near the U.S. border there is one memorial, “The North Wall”, at Assumption Park, Windsor, Ontario, overlooking the Detroit River. It honors the 103 Canadians who lost their lives in Vietnam and the seven who went missing in action. It is a fine tribute to those Canadians who served and sacrificed all for their belief in freedom.

The Road to Hell – Canadian Forces in Vietnam 1954-1973 (pdf), by Major Shane B. Schreiber

“In Vietnam, the Canadian government’s good intentions created a road to Hell that was made all the more slippery by a policy designed to be deliberately ambiguous.”

The North Wall

Canadian Vets

Canada’s Forgotten Veterans

Oh Canada, We Stood On Guard for Thee

Canada Took a Pass on Vietnam?

**The Nobel Peace Prize referenced was awarded in 1988, when United Nations Peace-Keeping Forces were awarded THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE for all peace-keeping duties up to December 1988.