The Congressional Inquisition

IN THE EARLY YEARS OF THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY, TO COMBAT THE RISING TIDE OF RELIGIOUS ORTHODOXY, THE DEMOCRATS GAVE THEIR LEADERS IN THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA LEAVE TO MOVE WITHOUT LET OR HINDRANCE THROUGHOUT THE LAND, IN A REIGN OF INTIMIDATION, FRIGHT AND VERBAL TORTURE THAT MADE THE SPANISH INQUISITION OF 1834, TO BE A MERE FRAT PARTY BY COMPARISON . . .

Former New York State Governor Mario Cuomo wants the United States Senate to ask Supreme Court nominee John Roberts: “Will you, Judge, apply a religious test to the Constitution? Will you start by saying, ‘I’m not going to support the Constitution if my pope tells me not to’’?”” (Original transcript of ‘’Meet the Press‘, 8 August 2005.)

Bill Press (Sun-Sentinel, 8-2-2005) warns that ““It is absolutely essential to explore Roberts’’ religious beliefs as part of the confirmation process.””

Frances Kissling (NPR, 8-1-2005): ““If this pope will intervene in the ways he has already in Europe, it certainly raises questions for us in the immediate sense in terms of whether he thinks he can tell John Roberts how to vote when he gets on the Supreme Court.””

Senator Dick Durbin has already announced that he will grill Roberts about his Catholic faith when he gets a chance at the Congressional Inquisition.

The Democrat Senators will proceed according to plan, notwithstanding the fact that Religious Inquisitions are proscribed by the United States Constitution under Article VI, Clause 3: “no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States.”

In 1987, Democrat Senator Howell Heflin voted against the nomination of Judge Robert Bork to the Supreme Court. As recalled by Best of the Web recently, the good Senator told the citizens of Alabama, that it was because he was “disturbed by his [Bork’s] refusal to discuss his belief in God–or the lack thereof.”

Linked at Outside the Beltway’s ‘Beltway Traffic Jam’ .

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