How Moonbats Celebrate July 4th

June 30, 2005

This Fourth of July, I ask you to find a way to thank the men and women defending our freedom by flying the flag…” -George W. Bush

The blog of criminal defense Denver attorney Jeralyn Merritt, TalkLeft: The Politics of Crime, advises readers how to go about answering the President’s plea to give thanks to those who put themselves in harm’s way defending freedom.

“July 4th: Listen to the President
Hit the freeways. Cardboard and paint is all it takes.
Join Freeway Blogger’s Summer of Truth.

“Signpainting parties against the war are being organized across the country over the 4th of July weekend with posting scheduled to start on the 5th. So far we have over 400 confirmed freewaybloggers for this action and should have well over a thousand by week’s end.”

While most Americans will be flying Old Glory, roasting weiners and having fun, the “true patriots” amongst us, the moonbats, will be walking the highways and byways of the land, posting placards for you to read. You may be lucky and spot this one somewhere in your neighborhood, brought to you by the folks at Freeway Blogger.

Trackedback at Outside the Beltway, Wizbang’s Carnival of Trackbacks, and Mudville Gazette.

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Every Blogger’s Doing It

June 30, 2005

Morphing Blogs into Web Magazines

Have you morphed your blog into an “On-line Magazine” yet? Why not, practically every other blogger has, according to CNN. Bob Brigham of Swing State Project tells us how to lose blogging buddies and gain MSM friends. He writes in a post entitled “Blogging Dies to Save Blogging”, that after he switched, it felt like he had won the lottery. “Socially I am living a rags to riches fairytale. Yesterday, I was friends with a bunch of ‘bloggers’ but today I’m friends with honest to goodness ‘members of the press’ — living the high life like a member of the Gang of 500. You too can improve your social standing with a single post, “.

Trey Jackson has the video of CNN (wmv) and the discussion of the blogs, Jackson’s Junction: Video: “Inside the Online Magazines”.

TalkLeft.com has a post today entitled “The Day the Bloggers Died“:

“As of yesterday, blogs are dead. Say hello to the Online Magazine Community. Others joining so far:

TalkLeft is joining the community. We are now ‘the online magazine for liberal coverage of crime-related political and injustice news.'”

The Talent Show has posted the transcript from the CNN discussion of blogs, er … “Web Magazines”:

TATTON: Yeah. And back to the left side. I just mentioned Atrios. This is Escaton who up until yesterday was a blogger, now announcing himself — Escaton, an online magazine of news, commentary and editorial. And you’ve got the background how all that happened.

SCHECHNER: We’ll tell you how this evolved. So, Duncan Black is one of several bloggers who has been testifying before the Federal Elections Commission over the past couple of days. They have been addressing the issue of who is a journalist, who is a blog. How should campaign regulation be extended into the blogosphere, if it should at all. They are all saying no, it should not.

But Duncan has some questions, wondering why he was treated differently as a blogger than he would be as a media entity. For example, why is Salon.com entitled to the media exemption, but not him. This sparked something.

TATTON: Yeah. Those questions raised over at Escaton. This post here from the talentshow.org, also until yesterday a blog. The site’s host realized the potential pit falls of being a blogger in this day and age of potential FEC regulations. So, they’ve taken drastic measures. They’re no longer calling themselves a blog, instead, a web magazine.

They say the content’s going to look the same, the site’s going to look the same, but the changes as far as the FEC is concerned will be drastic. Just in the name there. Starting tomorrow, my days as a blogger are ending and my days as a writer are beginning. Now, this has sparked lots of different people getting on this bandwagon doing the same thing. They update today looking at some of the sites doing the same thing. One of them is talkleft.com, who declared the day the bloggers died saying that we are now the online magazine for liberal coverage of crime-related political and injustice news. So, lots of people jumping on this.

SCHECHNER: Over at Swing State Project, Bob Brigham doing the same thing, saying he used to be friends with bloggers and now he is friends with members of the press. So you too can improve your social standing with one single post.

TATTON: So, lots of fun posts on this. But this is a very important topic to bloggers with a very important message out there for the FEC. Do not regulate us. We’ve been saying that all week. And that concludes today’s installment, Suzanne, of inside the online magazines, back to you.

Captain Ed at Captain’s Quarters says that he’s not doing it! This Is a Blog. This Will Remain a Blog, and he explains why. Trackedback at Blogs for Bush.


Saddam and Osama, Best Buds

June 29, 2005

“I never believed in the link between Saddam Hussein, Osama bin Laden, al-Qaeda and Islamist terrorism,” ~~former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, October 21, 2003, “Australia’s Melbourne Herald Sun”.

“As we all know by now, there was never a proven link between Saddam, al-Qaida or even the Crips.” ~~”Washington Post” columnist Richard Cohen, May 2005.

“The evidence now shows clearly that Saddam did not want to work with Osama bin Laden at all.” ~~August 2003, former vice president Albert Gore.

“Iraq was not a terrorist haven before the invasion,… Iraq was not even close to the center of the War on Terror before the president invaded it.” ~~Democratic candidate John Kerry, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, September 2004.

“Iraq was not a breeding ground for terrorism. Our invasion has made it one, … We were told Iraq was attracting terrorists from Al Qaeda. It was not.” ~~Senator Ted Kennedy, October 16, 2003.

Whenever you hear the old saw that there was NO connection between Saddam Hussein’s Iraq and Osama Bin Ladin and that we went to war with Iraq for the wrong reason, check out the facts at Saddam Hussein’s Philanthropy of Terror by Deroy Murdock, Media Fellow, Hoover Institution at Stanford University. This was adapted from a September 22, 2004 presentation at the Hoover Institution. There are more facts than anyone would have time to read. An excellent article! It ends by saying that Saddam Hussein deserves to be where he is right now – behind bars.

There are more links between Bin Laden and Hussein, according to Andrew C. McCarthy’s “It’s All About 9-11“, in “National Review On-line”. To learn more of Saddam’s terrorist handiwork, Deroy Murdock recommends reading the Stephen Hayes book, The Connection: How al Qaeda’s Collaboration with Saddam Hussein Has Endangered America.


Fireworks in Space

June 29, 2005

This Fourth of July is being called “Day of the Comet”, because there will be fireworks in space during the very early morning hours, and you should be able to see them. After having traveled 268 million miles in space, NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft will get up-close and engage comet Tempel 1 on July 4th, 2005. People world-wide will be able to view both the impact and resulting data and pictures of the interior of an exploding comet. An object the size of a coffee table will hit another object the size of a small automobile, at a force of 23,000 miles per hour. Deep Impact: Your First Look Inside a Comet!

“Like people gazing skyward to watch Independence Day fireworks, an international array of telescopes will train expert eyes on a dramatic encounter between NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft and a passing comet. The explosive event will happen 133.6 million kilometers (83 million miles) from Earth in the early hours of July 4 Eastern Daylight Time (late July 3 Pacific Daylight Time). Telescopes on the ground and others orbiting in space will document the mission’s crucial moments using different wavelengths of light.” (NASA)

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The 1805 Trafalgar Triumph

June 29, 2005

Off the coast of Portsmouth, England, the British are celebrating the 200th anniversary of the great naval rout by their Admiral Nelson at the Battle of Trafalgar.

Has it been 200 years already? My how time flies; it seems like only yesterday that the British, after being ousted by their American colonials, achieved the great victory at sea over Napolean and France. That victory bucked up the Tories so that they sailed back over to the other side of the Atlantic to take revenge on the upstart new cousin country. The British redcoats learned a lesson or two, finally, taught by General Andrew Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans. Isn’t it amazing how history just goes on and on until we finally wind down to today, which actually seems like only yesterday.

The original Anglo-Franco sea skirmish broke out on October 21, 1805, off the Spanish coast, and the victory by Britain against France, spelled the beginning of the end for Napoleon Bonaparte’s conquest of Europe.

Britain Honors 1805 Trafalgar Triumph: “PORTSMOUTH, England – Seventeen tall ships from five countries held a mock sea battle Tuesday off England’s coast to mark the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar, Adm. Horatio Nelson’s stunning victory at sea that gave Britain naval supremacy for a century.”

It would certainly be fair to say that England saved Europe from becoming French 200 years ago, and then again just recently, the English prime minister, Tony Blair, battled the French once again at Brussels, and vanquished Jacques “new Napolean” Chirac from seizing control of the continent in 2005.

Trackedback at basil’s blog and Chrenkoff, where Arthur has more information entitled “Nelson Rolling on his Column“.


Why Didn’t Rehnquist Retire?

June 28, 2005

Intrigues from the Most High Court, with an interesting prediction from KN@PPSTER who says “I’m suspicious“.

“Prediction: Rehnquist will give notice of his retirement on the afternoon that the Senate goes into its holiday recess. Bush will make a recess appointment — effectively putting whomever he wants in as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court through 2006, if I read it right. From C-SPAN:

“Any recess appointment the President makes during the first session of a Congress will last until the end of its second session [each Congress is split into two sessions of approximately one year each].

“If I’m right, you read it here first. If not … well, you read it here first anyway.”

Could be; wait and see, says Kerfuffles. I wonder if that would be a wise thing for Bushy to do? He is one wily coyote, that Bush, and I would not be at all surprised if he and Karl Rove have already made the plans as reported by ScrappleFace:

Bush May Condemn and Seize Supreme Court
by Scott Ott (2005-06-24) — A day after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that local governments may seize private property to promote economic development, President George Bush said he may soon move to seize the high court under “the executive branch’s power of eminent domain.”

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“God Save …This … Court”

June 28, 2005

from Smashing the Tablets of Stone
Moses and the Ten Commandments
The majority of the black robed justices ruled that the displaying of granite tablets of the Ten Commandments was not “free speech” and was unconstitutional in Kentucky courthouses. They further ruled that county officials were displaying them in order to advance religion, and that the First Amendment required that government be neutral. The dissenting voices were Chief Justice William Rehnquist, Justice Antonin Scalia, Justice Clarence Thomas, and in part Anthony Kennedy. Justice Scalia argued that the belief that government must always be neutral to religion is itself unconstitutional, reminding the justices that the Supreme Court opens every session with the words ‘God save the United States and this Honorable Court.’ Justice Souter and the majority of the court had ruled that ‘the First Amendment mandates government neutrality between religion and nonreligion.’ Justice Scalia sharply disagreed with him. ‘Who says so?’ he asked. ‘Surely not the words of the Constitution. Surely not the history and traditions that reflect our society’s constant understanding [of the First Amendment’s Establishment Clause].’

Amendment I: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

Justice Antonin Scalia, reading from the bench, argued that the Decalogue should always be allowed because the framers intended religion to be part of public life and because 97.9 percent of Americans who espouse religion – Christians, Jews and Muslims – believe in the ancient laws. Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, the deciding vote in the Kentucky case, countered “We do not count heads before enforcing the First Amendment.”

Thomas Jefferson, the third president of the United States, and author of much of the nation’s founding documents, predicted the fate of the Constitution in the hands of justices such as O’Connor and Souter. Jefferson wrote:

“The Constitution … is a mere thing of wax in the hands of the judiciary which they may twist and shape into any form they please.”